ALDI INTRODUCES TRAFFIC LIGHT QUEUEING SYSTEM TO LIMIT NUMBER OF CUSTOMERS IN STORES

If the light is red, entrance doors will stay closed and customers will have to wait until another shopper leaves

Aldi is introducing an automated traffic light queueing system to control the number of customers in its stores.

The budget supermarket is launching the new technology in select stores this week following a successful trial and will be available at all outlets by mid-summer.

Under the system, traffic lights will signal when customers are allowed to enter the stores based on individual store customer limits that are in line with two-metre social distancing rules.

When the light signals green, the doors will open meaning shoppers can enter the store.

However if the light is red, the doors will remain closed and customers will have to wait outside until another shopper leaves.

Aldi states that its NHS and blue light worker priority access remains in place, adding that these workers are being encouraged to go to the front of the queue with other customers being asked to continue to respect this.

The traffic light system will run alongside a number of measures already in place at all Aldi stores to ensure social distancing.

This includes protective screens at checkouts, distancing markers on shop floors, sanitisation stations for customers as well as signage to offer clear guidance on how to shop safely. Stores are also encouraging one customer per trolley where possible.

“The protection and safety of our customers and employees is our top priority and this new system is an accurate and effective way to allow us to control customer numbers in stores,” said Richard Thornton, communications director at Aldi.

“The system’s trial was well received by our customers and we will be gradually rolling this new social distancing measure out nationwide from this week.”

Last month, the supermarket launched an online shopping service for the first time to help vulnerable people during lockdown.

The parcels sold online contain 22 products, including long-lasting foods, such as tinned soup, rice and pasta, as well as antibacterial hand wash and a four-pack of toilet roll.

The products was designed to be delivered to vulnerable people and those who are self-isolating.

Read the full article here – independent.co.uk